Contemporary migration paradigm: managerial, legal, economic and sociocultural perspectives

Economic Annals-ХХI: Volume 179, Issue 9-10, Pages: 40-52

Citation information:
Chaplynskyi, K., Savishchenko, V., & Shevchenko, S. (2019). Contemporary migration paradigm: managerial, legal, economic and sociocultural perspectives. Economic Annals-XXI, 179(9-10), 40-52. doi: https://doi.org/10.21003/ea.V179-04


Kostyantyn Chaplynskyi
D.Sc. (Legal Sciences),
Professor,
Head of the Department of Forensics, Forensic Medicine and Psychiatry,
Dnipropetrovsk State University of Internal Affairs
26 Gagarin Ave., Dnipro, 49005, Ukraine
chaplinskii@ukr.net
ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9922-3743

Viktoriia Savishchenko
D.Sc. (Legal Sciences),
Associate Professor,
Dean of the Faculty of Law,
Dnipropetrovsk State University of Internal Affairs
26 Gagarin Ave., Dnipro, 49005, Ukraine
viktoriia9009@ukr.net
ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6278-4774

Serhii Shevchenko
D.Sc. (Public Administration),
Professor,
Honoured Worker of Education,
Head of the Department of Administration and Management,
Dnipropetrovsk State University of Internal Affairs
26 Gagarin Ave., Dnipro, 49005, Ukraine
alphabeta7373@gmail.com
ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0079-3069

Abstract. The article provides a complex analysis of models of interaction between migrants and a recipient society currently existing in the international practice, including new trends in the development of migration policies by various countries. It serves as a ground work aimed at the substantiation of conceptual foundations of the new migration paradigm based upon the change of social conditions and attitudes (from confrontation to acceptance) as well as the creation of legal, economic and social conditions for full-fledged inclusion of migrants into the new culture.

The authors are convinced in the necessity to employ previously unused resources of civilizational reforming, which would not harm both national economies and legal frameworks, as well as individuals and society as a whole.

Keywords: Migration Paradigm; Approaches to the Interaction of the Recipient Society with Migrants; Migration Management; Economic and Legal Problems in the Field of Migration; Multiculturalism

JEL Сlassification: F6; J61; J68; К37

Acknowledgements and Funding: The authors received no direct funding for this research.

Contribution: The authors contributed equally to this work.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.21003/ea.V179-04

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