The principles of synchronization in the distributed information systems

Economic Annals-ХХI: Volume 183, Issue 5-6, Pages: 79-88

Citation information:
Sinitsyn, I., Mironov, A., Vorontsov, Yu., Borzykh, N., & Mikhailova, E. (2020). The principles of synchronization in the distributed information systems. Economic Annals-XXI, 183(5-6), 79-88. doi: https://doi.org/10.21003/ea.V183-08


Ivan Sinitsyn
PhD (Engineering),
Associate Professor,
Software and IT-standard Department,
Institute of Information Technology,
MIREA – Russian Technological University
78 Vernadsky Ave., Moscow, 119454, Russia
sinicyn_i@mirea.ru
ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4302-1616

Anton Mironov
PhD (Engineering),
Senior Lecturer of the Software and IT-standard Department,
Institute of Information Technology,
MIREA – Russian Technological University
78 Vernadsky Ave., Moscow, 119454, Russia
mironov_an@mirea.ru
ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3086-8949

Yuriy Vorontsov
Assistant Professor of the Software and IT-standard Department,
Institute of Information Technology,
MIREA – Russian Technological University
78 Vernadsky Ave., Moscow, 119454, Russia
voroncov_yu@mirea.ru
ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1732-6002

Nikita Borzykh
Assistant Professor of the Software and IT-standard Department,
Institute of Information Technology,
MIREA – Russian Technological University
78 Vernadsky Ave., Moscow, 119454, Russia
borzyh@mirea.ru
ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0663-4958

Evgenia Mikhailova
Assistant Professor of the Software and IT-standard Department,
Institute of Information Technology,
MIREA – Russian Technological University
78 Vernadsky Ave., Moscow, 119454, Russia
mihajlova_e@mirea.ru
ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0105-9325

The principles of synchronization in the distributed information systems

Abstract. Information, especially its automated processing, is still an important factor in improving the efficiency of any organization. Distributed information systems (IS, ISs) differ from conventional ISs in architectural and infrastructural principles, as well as in the geographic location with integration into one information cluster.

One of the examples of distributed information systems is the infrastructure of the Google search engine – more than 2,000 servers, with server bases in almost every country in the world, which allows achieving a minimum delay in sending and receiving client requests.

A distributed information system can have a large number of different databases, both local and remote, with which constant data synchronization is required, while maintaining a backup copy of previous data in case of failures and emergency stops.

Distributed information systems are highly reliable and require multi-level protection of the cluster from unauthorized access, adherence to the principles of data synchronization, which differ from a conventional information system.

Within the framework of this paper, synchronization processes are investigated using mathematical and computational tools, creating an environment for distributed information systems. It is advisable to use the results of the work to coordinate the operation of components of multi-agent systems for various purposes, transmit messages between agents, build communication protocols, and provide conditions for self-organization of multi-agent systems.

Keywords: Information System; Distributed Information System; Conventional Information System; Synchronization; IT; Software; Technology

JEL Classіfіcatіon: D85; L86

Acknowledgements and Funding: The authors received no direct funding for this research.

Contribution: The authors contributed equally to this work.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.21003/ea.V183-08

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